Patience, Persistence, Prayer, and the Proper Use of Agitation

by Trish Huheey

On October 22, the 3rd-4th-5th grade St. Alban’s Sunday School class focused on persistence as a force for change. We studied the parable of the Widow and the Judge (below), and learned how the widow prayed and approached the Judge over and over, seeking justice, until he finally relented.

We watched our Whirl curriculum video, about a group of friends who lobby their friend’s baseball coach to let him play in a game. The coach initially ignores them, but the kids persist in standing up for their friend until the coach finally lets him play. This led to a discussion about times we stood up for something we believed in, and whether or not we persisted, if we did not succeed immediately.

Finally, we made sandcastles, and observed how water wears away at a sandcastle’s base. We also observed that, when we shook our trays and agitated the water, that the sandcastles wore down even faster. One of our students said that “agitating” sounded a lot like “annoying people,” so we discussed if there was a time to annoy people for good reasons! Jesus tells us that we should not give up!

The Parable of the Persistent Widow

Luke 18:1-8 (New International Version)

Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should always pray and not give up. He said: “In a certain town there was a judge who neither feared God nor cared what people thought. And there was a widow in that town who kept coming to him with the plea, ‘Grant me justice against my adversary.’

“For some time he refused. But finally he said to himself, ‘Even though I don’t fear God or care what people think, yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will see that she gets justice, so that she won’t eventually come and attack me!’”

And the Lord said, “Listen to what the unjust judge says. And will not God bring about justice for his chosen ones, who cry out to him day and night? Will he keep putting them off? I tell you, he will see that they get justice, and quickly. However, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?”

Shrine Mont Weekend 2019

Our annual Parish Weekend was held September 27-29 at Shrine Mont in Orkney Springs, Virginia. It was a time of relaxation and fun with new friends and old, in a beautiful mountain setting. Some folks hiked, some folks fished, some folks read, some folks napped, some folks even attended a program or two, but everybody came together for conversation, music, and a chance to enjoy the company of our parish family.

Here are just a few memories from the weekend (photos by Duncan McBride). We hope even more of our fellow parishioners will enjoy the weekend with us next year!

Get Ready for the Bazaar!

2019 Christmas Bazaar - Nov. 23, 9am - 2pmFor over 60 years, the St. Alban’s Christmas Bazaar has been a highlight of the year for our parish and our neighborhood. This year’s Bazaar is happening Saturday, November 23 from 9:00am to 2:00pm. At the Bazaar, you’ll discover a cornucopia of gifts and treasures, including toys, jewelry, books, decor, tools, baked goods, and more.

The Bazaar is an excellent place to make new friends, reconnect with neighbors and friends you haven’t seen in a while, do a little shopping, and enjoy delicious food at the café. The kids can enjoy face painting, a visit with Santa, and the moon bounce (weather permitting). Best of all, proceeds from the Bazaar go directly back into the community as we use all the funds to support our many outreach ministries and programs.

Join the Fun, Make a Difference

The Bazaar is one of our biggest annual programs and is only possible with the enthusiastic support of dozens of volunteers. From donation of goods to set-up and take-down, from decoration to promotion, we rely on the entire St. Alban’s family to make this event possible.

For additional information, please contact Nancy Calvert at billandnancycalvert@verizon.net, Sue Mairena at mairena75@verizon.net or one of the many area leads — view this document for a complete contact list.

Why do folks volunteer and help out with the Bazaar? 

“I participate in the Christmas Bazaar to get closer to all those St. Albanites I don’t see that often. The best way to get to know people is to work together.” (Ann Gates)

“I like participating in the St. Alban’s Bazaar because of the sense of community I feel while I am there. Not only from our St. Albanites – but also from the neighbors and friends that participate!” (Camille Stern)

“I was new at St. Alban’s when I first volunteered at the Bazaar. It was such a great way to get to know people that I did not hesitate when I was asked to be a co-chair a couple of years later. Working with so many fellow parishioners on the wide range of bazaar activities showed me how much everyone does to make St. Alban’s the friendly, welcoming and supportive place that it is.” (Betsy Anderson)

“I love working with our church family at the Bazaar! It is so much fun to see everyone put their best efforts in for the community of people who come to shop, eat and take in the day with us. Working at this event is a fantastic way to get to know my fellow churchmates.” (Ivy Kilby)

See even more testimonials and stories from volunteers in the October issue of The Word.

Please consider joining our band of enthusiastic volunteers! Our next meeting is Wed, 10/30 @ 6:30 pm in the Parish Hall. Everyone is welcome!

Donations Welcome!

The Bazaar closet is open for your donations! Please place items in boxes or sturdy bags marked with a description of the contents. As you choose which items to donate, please consider the sorts of items that you or others would like to buy.

All items should be clean and in good condition. Please make sure any battery‐operated items have a battery, so the customer can see that they work. For more information about donations, please contact Nancy Calvert or Sue Mairena.

Raffle Prizes Needed!

Our raffle is one of the most popular items at the Bazaar, but its success depends on the prizes being offered. Please consider donating a raffle prize, such as sporting event, theater or concert tickets; an offer of professional services (such as decorating a special cake or raking leaves or detailing a car); or gift cards, which are always popular!

To donate an item (preferred value of $75 or greater), please complete this form (you can also use the form to upload a photo, if possible). Actual prizes can be delivered to the church now or during the event set-up. Please contact Chris Peck or Stephanie Lightner for more information about the raffle.

The October Issue of The Word

Page 1 of October 2019 IssueCheck your mailbox for the latest issue of The Word, the St. Alban’s print newsletter — or feel free to download a PDF copy here. (If you’d like to be put on our mailing list, just use the contact form here to tell us you’d like to receive our mailings and be sure to include your complete mailing address.)

In the October 2019 Issue

Father Jeff on stewardship: “Just like the unmarked merchandise at your local store, there typically isn’t a price tag on the ministries and activities at St. Alban’s – but what we do comes with a price. The real cost of our ministries is difficult to pin down, but our Stewardship Committee works hard to accurately reflect the cost, and value, of what we do together at St. Alban’s.”

Father Paul on autumn activity: “As we move into a new season of ministry, there will be new challenges. Change is never easy. Now, more than ever, we need to be gracious with one another. The opportunities before us will stretch us in uncomfortable ways; but if we are bold and faithful, our work will bear much good fruit.”

Deacon Teresa on our Sleepy Hollow Nursing Home ministry: “I remember how hesitant I was when Fr. Jeff sent me to lead a service and how surprised I was that it drew me in. We would love to add new volunteers. Talk to anyone who serves there about moments that have touched them and have shown them God more fully.”

Plus the latest construction updates on our new kitchen; our stewardship committee ponders “Wonder in All”; tons of photos, and lots more!

Download the PDF here.

30 September: Feast of St. Michael and All Angels (Michaelmas, transferred from 9/29)

Icon of St Michael written by Zachary Rosemann, for St. Michael’s Church, Brattleboro, Vermont.

Today, Episcopalians observe the Feast of St. Michael and All Angels, commonly known as Michaelmas. This feast is observed annually on 29 September by Anglicans, and others, around the world. (It’s transferred, by custom, and according to the rubrics in the Book of Common Prayer, to the next available weekday.)

Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle. Be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil; May God rebuke him, we humbly pray; And do thou, O Prince of the Heavenly Host, by the power of God, thrust into hell Satan and all evil spirits who wander through the world for the ruin of souls. Amen.

The biblical word “angel” (Greek: angelos) means, literally, a messenger. Messengers from God can be visible or invisible, and may assume human or non-human forms. Christians have always felt themselves to be attended by helpful spirits—swift, powerful, and enlightening. Those beneficent spirits are often depicted in Christian art in human form, with wings to signify their swiftness and spacelessness, with swords to signify their power, and with dazzling raiment to signify their ability to enlighten. Unfortunately, this type of pictorial representation has led many to dismiss the angels as “just another mythical beast, like the unicorn, the griffin, or the sphinx.”

Of the many angels spoken of in the Bible, only four are called by name: Michael, Gabriel, Uriel, and Raphael. The Archangel Michael is the powerful agent of God who wards off evil from God’s people, and delivers peace to them at the end of this life’s mortal struggle. “Michaelmas,” as his feast is called in England, has long been one of the popular celebrations of the Christian Year in many parts of the world.

Michael is the patron saint of countless churches, including Mont Saint-Michel, the monastery fortress off the coast of Normandy that figured so prominently in medieval English history; and Coventry Cathedral, England’s most famous modern church building, rising from the ashes of the Second World War.

Everlasting God, who has ordained and constituted in a wonderful order the ministries of angels and mortals: Mercifully grant that, as your holy angels always serve and worship you in heaven, so by your appointment they may help and defend us here on earth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

The Lord is glorious in his angels and in his saints: O come, let us adore him.

(from Lesser Feasts & Fasts 2018, Church Publishing.)

23 September: Thecla, apostle and proto-martyr among women, c.70

Today, we honor the memory of an apostle, Saint Thecla — a contemporary of Saint Paul who became an evangelizer after hearing his teachings.

God of liberating power, you raised up your apostle Thecla, who allowed no obstacle or peril to inhibit her from bearing witness to new life in Jesus Christ: Empower courageous evangelists among us, that men and women everywhere may experience the freedom you offer; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Thecla was born to a rich family in Iconium, a town in Asia Minor. She was expected to marry, and marry well. In fact, her mother had a young man picked out for her. He had an excellent position and could offer Thecla a secure life. This was important in Thecla’s day because an unmarried woman could find herself with no support and no money. Marriage assured a stable place in society, with children to carry on the family name.

But something happened to Thecla that made her turn away forever from her mother’s dream. The apostle Paul, who had been in Antioch, traveled to Iconium and began teaching at a house near Thecla’s. She sat in her open window for three days and nights, listening as Paul spoke about the blessings of giving everything to God. Thecla decided not to marry and to devote her life to Jesus Christ.

Her fiancé Thamyris was furious and complained to the local governor that Paul was a bad influence. Because Thamyris was so prominent, Paul was arrested and imprisoned.

Late at night Thecla secretly went to the prison, bribed the guards, and stayed to hear Paul’s teaching. When her family found her, they turned her and Paul over to the authorities. Paul was driven from the city and Thecla was sentenced to death. Her mother was so angry at her daughter’s disobedient “madness” that she wouldn’t intervene.

Thecla was tortured, but God delivered her from death. She found her way to Antioch and soon met Paul there. She helped him preach, and together they did good work for the Lord.

But once again a powerful person, this time the city governor, tried to turn Thecla toward marriage. When she hurt his pride by refusing he denounced her to the authorities. She was arrested and sentenced to die in the arena. But the wild beasts wouldn’t harm her, and when their attempt to drown her also failed, the officials were so frightened that they let her go. She retreated to a rocky desert cave in the mountains near the town of Ma’aloula, Syria. Through her prayer she converted many and gathered other women monastics around her. She counseled people and healed the sick, never asking for money.

Even there, though, she was pursued. Jealous pagan doctors sent young men to harm the saint, now an old woman. But God heard her prayers and opened up a fissure in the rock of the cave. Thecla rushed into the space, which immediately closed up again.

Today you can visit Thecla’s cave, and see in it the still-running spring that provided water for her. The nuns who live in the Mar Thecla monastery there will tell you her story, and show you the fissure in the rock where this saint, “Equal to the Apostles”, left the world and joined her Lord in the Kingdom.

(Hagiography by the Department of Christian Education of the Orthodox Church in America.)

St. Alban’s at the Acolyte Festival (National Cathedral)

ACOLYTE FESTIVAL at the National Cathedral

Saturday, October 12, 2019 | 9 am – 4 pm

Calling all acolytes – skilled or aspiring – and their families! We are organizing a group to go this year. There will be a grand procession, worship in the Cathedral, good food, lawn games, relays, and more. If you’re an acolyte, or ever wanted to be, this is a great way to see (UP CLOSE) all the things acolytes can do – and meet other acolytes from around the DC region and around the country!

More information: https://cathedral.org/acolytefestival

Cost: Free! (St. Alban’s will cover the cost.)

RSVP: by Monday, September 30, 2019 HERE

A note from Fr. Paul:

WE NEED YOU! Serving at the altar as an acolyte is both a huge responsibility and a huge privilege – the acolyte is an essential part of our worship heritage as Anglicans. Acolytes get a front row seat every Sunday! If you haven’t served at the altar before, perhaps now is YOUR time! Anyone (grade 3 and up) is eligible to serve. You don’t need experience, just a willingness to serve God and help our people worship Him in Spirit and in truth! Email Jane Lesko or Adam Huston, or a member of the clergy, for more information!

September 16: Ninian, bishop, and missionary to Scotland, 430

Today, September 16, the Episcopal Church joins the people of Scotland in remembering St. Ninian: “Apostle to the Southern Picts.”

O God, who by the preaching of your blessed servant and bishop Ninian caused the light of the Gospel to shine in the land of Britain: Grant, we pray, that, having his life and labors in remembrance, we may show our thankfulness by following the example of his zeal and patience; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ninian was a Celt, born in southern Scotland in about 360, and is regarded as the first major preacher of the Gospel to the people living in Britain north of the Wall–that is, living outside the territory that had been under Roman rule. He is said to have studied in Rome (note that he is contemporary with Ambrose, Jerome, and Augustine), but was chiefly influenced by his friendship with Martin of Tours, with whom he spent some considerable time when he was returning from Italy to Britain.

It is probable that he named his headquarters in Galloway after Martin’s foundation in Gall.  At about the time of Martin’s death in 397, Ninian built a church at Galloway, in southwest Scotland. It was built of stone and plastered white, an unusual construction in a land where almost all buildings were wood. He called it Candida Casa (White House) or Whithorn, presumably after Martin’s foundation at Tours. Archaeologists have excavated and partially restored his church in this century.

From his base at Galloway, Ninian preached throughout southern Scotland, south of the Grampian Mountains, and conducted preaching missions among the Picts of Scotland, as far north as the Moray Firth, He also preached in the Solway Plains and the Lake District of England. Like Patrick (a generation later) and Columba (a century and a half later), he was a principal agent in preserving the tradition of the old Romano-British Church and forming the character of Celtic Christianity.

Our information about him comes chiefly from Bede’s History (Book 3, chapter 4), an anonymous eighth century account, and a 12th century account by Aelred. Aelred is writing 700 years after the event, and is for that reason rejected as untrustworthy by many critics. However, he claims to rely on an earlier account, “written by a barbarian.” This suggests that he may have had an authentic record by a member of Ninian’s community in Galloway.

Hagiography by James Kiefer. Read more.

September 13: Saint John Chrysostom, Bishop of Constantinople, 407

John Chrysostom, Patriarch of Constantinople, is one of the great saints of the Eastern Church. The Episcopal Church joins the Roman Church in remembering him today, September 13.

He was born about 354 in Antioch, Syria. As a young man, he responded to the call of desert monasticism until his health was impaired. He returned to Antioch after six years, and was ordained a priest. In 397, he became Patriarch of Constantinople.

His episcopate was short and tumultuous. Many criticized his ascetical life in the episcopal residence, and he incurred the wrath of the Empress Eudoxia, who believed that he had called her a “Jezebel.”

John, called “Chrysostom,” which means the golden-mouthed,” was one of the greatest preachers in the history of the Church. People flocked to hear him. His eloquence was accompanied by an acute sensitivity to the needs of people. He saw preaching as an integral part of pastoral care, and as a medium of teaching. He warned that if a priest had no talent for preaching the Word, the souls of those in his charge “will fare no better than ships tossed in the storm.”

His sermons provide insights into the liturgy of the Church, and especially into eucharistic practices. He describes the liturgy as a glorious experience, in which all of heaven and earth join. His sermons emphasize the importance of lay participation in the Eucharist. He wrote,

“Why do you marvel that the people anywhere utter anything with the priest at the altar, when in fact they join with the Cherubim themselves, and the heavenly powers, in offering up sacred hymns?”

His treatise, Six Books on the Priesthood, is a classic manual on the priestly office and its awesome demands. The priest, he wrote, must be “dignified, but not haughty; awe-inspiring, but kind; affable in his authority; impartial, but courteous; humble, but not servile, strong but gentle … ”

A well-loved prayer attributed to him, “A Prayer of St. Chrysostom,” is offered as an option in Daily Office liturgies in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer:

Almighty God, you have given us grace at this time with one accord to make our common supplication to you; and you have promised through your well-beloved son, that when two or three are gathered together in his name, you will be in the midst of them. Fulfill now, O Lord, our desires and petitions as may be best for us; granting us in this world knowledge of your truth, and in the age to come, life everlasting. Amen.

During his lifetime, he was twice exiled; and he died during the second period of banishment, on September 14, 407. Thirty-one years later, his remains were brought back to Constantinople, and buried on January 27 (when the Orthodox Churches honor his memory.) His relics may be visited to this day, along with those of St. Basil the Great and St. Gregory Nazianzus, in the Church of Saint George on the grounds of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople in Istanbul.

O God, you gave your servant John Chrysostom grace eloquently to proclaim your righteousness in the great congregation, and fearlessly to bear reproach for the honor of your Name: mercifully grant to all bishops and pastors such excellence in preaching, and faithfulness in ministering your Word, that your people may be partakers with them of the glory that shall be revealed; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God for ever and ever. Amen.

(Hagiography adapted from A Great Cloud of Witnesses, Church Publishing.)