No matter how far apart two sides are, there are effective strategies to bring people together…

How many of us have ever prayed, ‘Lord make me an instrument of your peace,’ then found ourselves in complex and polarized situations that made peace seemingly impossible?

Make Me an Instrument of Peace is a 5-week course designed to help us bridge the divides that keep us from moving forward.

Designed by the Office of Government Relations of The Episcopal Church, and combining conversation, discussion and short videos, this course is ideal for those who want to take dialog between polarized people or parties seriously.

The first session will begin on Sunday, October 4 at 9:00am and run for about 50 minutes on Zoom. The remaining sessions will be held on October 11, 18, 25 and November 1 (all at 9:00 am). Each session will be led by St. Alban’s clergy, but will be ‘taught’ by a team of experts in civil discourse. This course includes these five sessions:

If you would like more information about the program, please contact Deacon Theresa or register below (we ask that you register so that we can send you the participant’s guide):

Participate in the Episcopal Justice Assembly – June 20

On Saturday, June 20, you are invited to participate with The Episcopal Justice Assembly for The Poor People’s Campaign Moral March on Washington Digital Gathering. Register using this link to receive more information. The Poor People’s Campaign is a non-partisan, interracial, intersectional, gathering of impacted people, religious and social justice partners building on the work of Dr. Martin Luther King’s Poor People’s Campaign. Learn more about the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for a Moral Revival. Questions? Contact Deacon Theresa.

A Growing Epidemic of Evictions in Fairfax County

In the 1980’s, I worked at a shelter for families and single adults who were returning to the community after hospitalization for mental illness. It quickly became clear to me that many are only one or two paychecks away from having to make difficult decisions about paying for housing, for food or for medication. Over 30 years later, this is still true.

Our health and well-being are directly related to numerous factors, including stable housing. Fairfax County continues to reduce the number of people experiencing homelessness, but income levels aren’t keeping pace with the cost of living in several areas of the county. Evidence suggests that there is an increase in evictions in our county, especially among people of color and our most vulnerable neighbors.

Alliance for Human Services

On June 13, the Fairfax County Alliance for Human Services’ annual meeting will feature a panel discussion, “There’s a Knock at Our Door: The Growing Epidemic of Evictions and Housing Instability in Our Community,” at 7:30 pm at Little River United Church of Christ, 8410 Little River Turnpike, Annandale. Light refreshments will be served. The meeting is open to the public.

Speakers will discuss how evictions affect the lives of county residents and Virginians, and lead a conversation about what we, as caring citizens, can do to stem this increase. Presenters include: Dipti Pidikiti-Smith, Deputy Director of Advocacy, Legal Services of Northern Virginia; David Levine, President and CEO, Good Shepherd Housing & Family Services, Inc. and senior staff from the RVA Eviction Lab at Virginia Commonwealth University, who have conducted important research on the effect of evictions in Virginia. I invite you to join me at the panel discussion and to consider exploring this issue and its impact on our community.